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The Havering Association of Cricket Officials donate heart defibrillator to Hornchurch Cricket Club

PUBLISHED: 13:00 12 July 2016

Roy Smith (right) is captain of Hornchurch Cricket Club who play at Harrow Lodge Park (pic: Gavin Ellis/TGS Photo).

Roy Smith (right) is captain of Hornchurch Cricket Club who play at Harrow Lodge Park (pic: Gavin Ellis/TGS Photo).

©TGS Photo tgsphoto.co.uk +44 1376 553468

The Havering Association of Cricket Officials has disbanded due to no candidates being able to take the course forward

The Havering Association of Cricket Officials donated a heart defibrillator to Hornchurch Cricket Club last month.

The Essex League club have allowed the Havering Association of Cricket Officials to use their base to train umpires over the last 32 years.

Unfortunately the disbandment of the Havering Association of Cricket Officials has occurred after no candidates to take the courses came forward in the 2014 or 2015 training seasons from October to March each year.

A statement said: “It was decided at our final meeting to utilise the accrued funds of the Association for a good cause and it was unanimously agreed to present Hornchurch Cricket Club, in thanks for their generous hospitality over 32 years, with a heart defibrillator machine after the death of a player on the field of play in north Essex last year where a defibrillator, readily available, might have saved his life.

“The ceremony of handing over the machine with a descriptive plaque was made by six representatives of HACO who expressed the hope it would not be used, but it was some comfort to know that it was there if needed and the gift was received with grateful thanks by senior members of Hornchurch Cricket Club.”

Brian Clay, the honorary secretary of the HACO, was present along with Lance Malkin, Michael Houghton, Steve Brabner, Aubrey King and Doug Shewring.

The donation of the defibrillator machine to Hornchurch was made in recognition of their hospitality to HACO in allowing them to use their clubhouse during the winter months since 1984 for the purpose of training umpires for the local leagues.

A further statement read: “The disbandment of the Association points up the situation whereby qualified umpires will become very thin on the ground as the present incumbents become older and retire.

“This is all due to a lack of interest in taking the course and exams because of the expense and time factors involved.

“A Level One course can take three months to complete and costs around £40.00 as well as having to attend weekly classes. To progress even higher up the umpiring ladder can cost a lot more and is very off putting to prospective candidates.”


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