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Revealed: 16 care homes in Havering failed to meet fire safety standards following Grenfell Tower fire

PUBLISHED: 07:00 17 May 2019 | UPDATED: 08:04 17 May 2019

Sixteen care homes in Havering failed fire safety inspections which were carried out after the Grenfell Tower tragedy. Picture: PA / David Mirzoeff

Sixteen care homes in Havering failed fire safety inspections which were carried out after the Grenfell Tower tragedy. Picture: PA / David Mirzoeff

PA Wire/PA Images

Sixteen care homes in Havering failed to meet fire safety standards after inspections were carried out by the London Fire Brigade following the Grenfell Tower fire.

London Assembly member, Tom Copley, has urged care homes to "co-operate fully with the LFB to get their fire safety standards up to scratch" to prevent any future tragedies.

He said: "It is very concerning that some of the most vulnerable Londoners are being put at risk in this way.

"These inspections carried out by the LFB have been vital in highlighting, not only a local issue, but one that urgently affects the whole of our capital."

In Redbridge, 20 care homes failed to meet fire safety standards, along with eight in Barking and Dagenham, and 19 in Newham.

Labour's London Assembly member, Andrew Dismore AM, who obtained the figures, said: "It is extremely concerning that in the wake of the Grenfell tragedy, fire regulations are still being routinely flouted in the places that you would least expect them to be."

Regional data shows that 1,226 fire safety audits have been carried out by the LFB at care homes across the capital since June 2017.

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Of this total, 51 received an enforcement notice and 498 received a notice of deficiencies. The remaining majority of care homes were found to be "broadly compliant" with the fire safety standards.

The figures were obtained by Andrew Dismore from a written response provided by the mayor of London in response to a question asked by the London Assembly.

According to the LFB enforcement policy statement, a notice of deficiencies (NOD) does not carry any statutory force, but if the responsible person for fire safety on the premises fails to undertake the specified improvements, the LFB is able to take this into account during future inspections.

An enforcement notice is issued by the LFB where the inspector can identify on the premises a clear breach of the law, significant risk factors or improvements that can be made within a set period of time.

LFB's assistant commissioner Dan Daly, said: "Over half the care homes we inspected had to make improvements to their fire safety arrangements despite them housing some of London's most vulnerable residents.

"My main concern is that this audit is only the tip of the iceberg.

"Care home owners need to urgently review their fire risk assessments and ensure their staff know how to safely evacuate their residents, especially those who are immobile."

In his written answer, Mayor of London Sadiq Khan said: "In all cases, the responsible person for the premises is encouraged to maintain an ongoing dialogue with the local fire safety team to ensure sustained and robust fire safety management practices are maintained going forward."

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