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Queen’s Hospital unveils new ultrasound equipment to aid diagnosis of patients

PUBLISHED: 12:00 03 April 2019

BHRUT invested around £170,000 into new portable point-of-care ultrasound machines which feature a hand-held ultrasound probe meaning they can be wheeled into position. Picture: BHRUT

BHRUT invested around £170,000 into new portable point-of-care ultrasound machines which feature a hand-held ultrasound probe meaning they can be wheeled into position. Picture: BHRUT

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Doctors and nurses have unveiled four new cutting edge ultrasound machines hailed as “the new stethoscope” to help examine patients quickly and accurately.

Staff at Queen's Hospital in Rom Valley Way were delighted to unveil four new ultrasound machines which will help them diagnose patients quickly and more accurately. Picture: BHRUTStaff at Queen's Hospital in Rom Valley Way were delighted to unveil four new ultrasound machines which will help them diagnose patients quickly and more accurately. Picture: BHRUT

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust (BHRUT) invested around £170,000 into new portable point-of-care ultrasound machines which feature a hand-held ultrasound probe meaning they can be wheeled into position, allowing doctors immediate ultrasound to aid diagnosis, treatment and decision making.

The machines will be used in Queen’s Hospital’s Emergency Department (ED) in Rom Valley Way which is one of the busiest emergency departments in London.

ED consultant, Darryl Wood said: “These machines are the future – think of them as the new stethoscope. There are so many benefits.

“For example, if a patient comes in with a suspected fracture, we can use this device straight away to confirm that, and make an immediate, informed decision about the next steps – perhaps that’s referring for an x-ray, and immediately we could provide appropriate pain relief and immobilise the injury.”

He added: “Using this technology is a mandatory requirement for registrar training, so it’s really valuable as a learning opportunity, and will help us showcase the Trust as a great place for doctors to develop.

“We will also use this technology to do some exciting and valuable research.”


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