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Romford mum empowered by yoga shares wellbeing message for New Year

PUBLISHED: 10:00 02 January 2017

Gee Gahir with her chair based yoga group that relieves pressure on joints and hips. Frances Hyde, Rasila Parkar, Sonny Singh, Gee and the Recorders Ann-Marie.

Gee Gahir with her chair based yoga group that relieves pressure on joints and hips. Frances Hyde, Rasila Parkar, Sonny Singh, Gee and the Recorders Ann-Marie.

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A mum-of-one who founded her own holistic therapies business after being diagnosed with osteoarthritis hopes to spread a positive message around health and wellbeing this New Year.

Gee Gahir helping reporter Ann-Marie Abbasah with one of her posesGee Gahir helping reporter Ann-Marie Abbasah with one of her poses

Gee Gahir, 47, of Rossall Close, Romford, was born with congenital hip dysplasia, which caused her femur to keep coming out of its socket.

After developing osteoarthritis, Gee was told by doctors at the age of 34 that she would need a total hip replacement.

She managed to delay having the procedure for a decade, and has since found comfort in yoga, as well as alternative therapies, and is now set to launch classes at Fairkytes Arts Centre, Billet Lane, Hornchurch.

“I was young,” said Gee, while speaking of the diagnosis.

Gee Gahir teaching Barbara Lambertini chair based yoga techniques.Gee Gahir teaching Barbara Lambertini chair based yoga techniques.

“They say the replacements only have a 10-year life span and it’s metal on metal.

“My arthritis was really painful but I didn’t go through with the 
hip replacement. I decided to manage it using complementary therapies.”

Gee found yoga and shiatsu – a Japanese therapy based on the same principles as acupuncture – relieved her pain and she was able to avoid having surgery until 2014.

“After the surgery the upper body was completely misaligned. You have this foreign object in your body.

“Hospital staff try to make you independent. Because you only had hip surgery the focus is just on the hip not on the misalignment with the rest of the body, like the shoulder.”

While in hospital, Gee put her yoga and shiatsu training into good use and recovered from her surgery in four weeks, in contrast to the usual 12.

“I looked around me and thought there’s so many people that are suffering with pain, maybe I could do something about this,” she added.

“I realised that people needed a whole body approach to rehabilitation.”

This led Gee to create 2020 Holistic Health, which delivers postural wellbeing and nutritional therapies, including chair-based yoga.

Chair-based yoga fan Frances Hyde, of Hornchurch, suffers from osteoporosis, a condition where the bones become brittle and fragile.

“I think it’s great,” she said.

“On the chair you’re doing the same yoga exercises but the chair is supporting you.

“Most people with arthritis don’t do anything at all. They stay sedentary in an armchair, but strength is in the muscles and they support your bones.”

Gee said: “I want to empower and enable people to become independent.”

Gee’s first two Fairkytes sessions will take place on January 8 and 15, with each class costing £10. For more information, visit 2020holistichealth.com.


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