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Romford man kills himself day after telling doctor he wanted to get better

PUBLISHED: 18:00 26 October 2010 | UPDATED: 09:33 27 October 2010

Romford Station

Romford Station

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A MAN with mental health problems killed himself by jumping in front of a train a day after telling his doctor that he wanted to get better

An inquest into the death of Trevor Gillibrand from Junction Road, Romford, at Walthamstow Coroner’s Court heard that he died on March 10 at Romford Station when he was hit by the fast train at around 3.45pm.

The day before his death the 45-year-old attended an appointment with his consultant psychiatrist Dr Francis Dunne, the inquest heard.

Dr Dunne told the court that Mr Gillibrand was very agitated, but he had no worries about sending him home because he had increased his dosage of medication and the man had said he was determined to get better.

He said: “Mr Gillibrand was taking his medication and he wanted to get better and he did not appear to have any suicidal thoughts so it was a shock to hear that he had killed himself.”

The court also heard that a memoir was found at Mr Gillibrand’s flat which he used to stop himself from getting paranoid.

Coroner, Dr Elizabeth Stearns, said: “He would tell himself that people were not talking about him and it seemed that he was doing everything he could to try to stabilise his life.”

A colleague first became concerned about Mr Gillibrand’s safety when he failed to turn up for his shift as a security guard, at 7pm on the day of his death.

His manager, Marc Phillips, told the court that he was a ‘difficult worker’ because he would think other staff were talking about him and he would call him crying, but he said that he was good at his job and was very particular with his time keeping.

The court heard that colleagues tried calling the man’s home phone but there was no answer.

Evidence was also heard from witness Billy Gray who was standing at the opposite platform when he saw Mr Gillibrand walk into the direction of the oncoming train.

Mr Gillibrand had a history of mental health problems which started off in 2004 and he was put on medication for depression and anxiety.

At one stage his depression got better, but it flared up again in recent years and he was sectioned after getting paranoid that people were following him.

He also expressed thoughts that he wanted to kill himself by jumping from a building.

Verdict: He killed himself whilst suffering from mental health problems.

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