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Review: Brookside Theatre’s Little Shop of Horrors is a dark hilarious tale of greed

PUBLISHED: 15:00 25 February 2019

Brookside Theatre's Little Shop of Horrors. Photo: Ted Sepple

Brookside Theatre's Little Shop of Horrors. Photo: Ted Sepple

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Little Shop of Horrors at Brookside Theatre is a dark humorous tale of a rare exotic plant and one man’s greed.

Little Shop of Horrors at Romford's Brookside Theatre. Photo: Ted SeppleLittle Shop of Horrors at Romford's Brookside Theatre. Photo: Ted Sepple

Having not watched the 1960 Roger Corman cult classic film, I was pleasantly surprised by bizarre story of Little Shop of Horrors at Brookside Theatre in Eastern Road, Romford.

Starring Sam Towler as the useless florist’s assistant Seymour, the play tells the story of the discovery of a man-eating plant that at first brings some success to the impoverished streets of Skid Row in New York.

Seymour, who is desperate to please Mr Mushnik (Steve Probert), the owner of the florist and his crush, Audrey (Liberty Watts) soon finds himself desperate to feed the man-eating plant Audrey II at all costs.

He has no problem sizing up Audrey’s no-good violent dentist boyfriend, Orin (Chris Ribbing) as potential food for the plant, but soon struggles to maintain his innocence in a bid to satisfy the plant.

Seymour has to work out how far he will go to get the girl of his dreams.

Neesha Robinson, Koreen Samuel and Simone Elesha played The Urchins, a young trio of narrators who provided some great 1950s styled vocals as well as an extra insight into the character’s stories.

Little Shop of Horrors at Romford's Brookside Theatre. Photo: Ted SeppleLittle Shop of Horrors at Romford's Brookside Theatre. Photo: Ted Sepple

I was curious to see how the theatre would stage the growing Venus Fly Trap plant and was delighted that the musical did not disappoint with some great comedy moments as the characters interact with Audrey II.

At times Audrey II threatened to steal the show with some witty one-liners and a highly entertaining duet with Seymour.

This clearly wasn’t just a plant with killer potential, but a plant with a seductive personality to boot.

PJ Tomlinson on puppetry did a great job of mastering the massive plant and bringing its character to life on the stage.

Little Shop of Horrors is a gruesome and hilarious musical with some great catchy tunes.

I’m sure I wasn’t the only audience member who left with a renewed fear of the dentist and skepticism of strange looking plants.

The man eating plant Audrey II stole the show in Brookside Theatre's Little Shop of Horrors. Photo: Ted SeppleThe man eating plant Audrey II stole the show in Brookside Theatre's Little Shop of Horrors. Photo: Ted Sepple

For more information about any of the other theatre’s productions visit brooksidetheatre.com.

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