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Election 2017: Havering voters agree with prime minister as MPs back plans for June 8 vote

PUBLISHED: 16:42 19 April 2017 | UPDATED: 17:25 19 April 2017

Tellers approach the speaker to announce the result of a vote by MPs in the House of Commons as they cleared the way for a general election on June 8. Picture: PA Wire/PA Images.

Tellers approach the speaker to announce the result of a vote by MPs in the House of Commons as they cleared the way for a general election on June 8. Picture: PA Wire/PA Images.

PA Wire/PA Images

The snap election announced by Theresa May yesterday, has been approved by MPs.

Mrs May was backed by the House of Commons by a margin of 522 votes to 13, above the two-thirds majority needed and was supported by Labour and the Lib Dems.

In her speech outside Downing Street yesterday, the prime minster said an election was in the country’s best interest following last year’s vote to leave the European Union.

She said: “I have concluded the only way to guarantee certainty and security for years ahead is to hold this election.”

A Recorder poll showed the people of Havering also backed the move.

Out of 102 voters, 59 per cent agreed with Mrs May to hold a snap general election as opposed to 31pc who said no and 10pc who did not know.

Speaking on Facebook, Nick Coyne said: “Let’s see how her Brexit negotiations go first, then have an election.”

Fifty per cent said they would vote Conservative, 25pc Labour, 11pc Liberal Democrats, 4pc Ukip and 68pc said they would vote the same as they did in the previous election.

“Never have I felt so strongly about an election,” said Julie Cooper on Facebook.

“I find myself having to face voting tactically which saddens me no end.”

The right to vote should not be given to 16-year-olds according to 63pc of voters as opposed to 32pc who thought they should.

Justifying the decision to call the election, Mrs May said: “The country is coming together but Westminster is not.”

She blamed the Lib Dems, for wanting to “grind” the business of government to a standstill, the SNP for threatening to vote against negotiations and Labour’s threat to vote against the final Brexit agreement.

Sixty-one per cent of voters agreed that opposition parties were doing more harm than good, and 60pc said the election would provide more stability.

Commenting on social media, Ruth Howard said: “Whoever in this area wants to get in [to government] needs to get out and about and communicate with the community all the time, not just see their faces at the front door when elections are due.”


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