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‘Petrified’ seven-week-old kittens locked in hamster cage dumped in Central Park, Harold Hill

PUBLISHED: 16:00 05 September 2017

Three seven-week-old kittens locked in a hamster cage were dumped in Central Park, Harold Hill. Picture: RSPCA

Three seven-week-old kittens locked in a hamster cage were dumped in Central Park, Harold Hill. Picture: RSPCA

RSPCA

Kittens locked in a hamster cage and dumped in a park were “absolutely petrified”, according to an RSPCA manager.

Three seven-week-old kittens locked in a hamster cage were dumped in Central Park, Harold Hill. Picture: RSPCAThree seven-week-old kittens locked in a hamster cage were dumped in Central Park, Harold Hill. Picture: RSPCA

Maddie Collier, manager of the RSPCA Essex, Havering and Harold Hill branch in Chippenham Road, Harold Hill, was upset to see the state three seven-week-old ginger kittens were in when they were brought to the charity.

She said: “A lovely young boy came to us with the kittens in the small cage and told us he found them in Central Park in Harold Hill, with what looked like a child’s onesie on top of them.

“He did the right thing by taking them to us, unlike their previous owners.

“First of all I thought they were feral, because they were covered in fleas, had a belly full of worms and were absolutely petrified - I have never seen kittens so frightened.

Fosterer Jacky Danilovic with the three rescued kittens (left to right) Freddy, Riley and Mia. Picture: RSPCAFosterer Jacky Danilovic with the three rescued kittens (left to right) Freddy, Riley and Mia. Picture: RSPCA

“But after we took them out of that cage which they couldn’t even stand up in and gave them some food, they did calm down.

“They were house-trained as well so they definitely lived in a proper home.

“It does make you lose faith in people when you see animals so upset and scared. Bbut then again, they came to us because of that boy who wanted to do the right thing.”

The kittens - which have been named Riley, Freddie and Mia - have been given treatment for their fleas and worms and are now temporarily living in a foster home.

“We’ve had a few people saying they’re interested in having the kittens already but we want to make sure that they’re healthy and microchipped before we let them go elsewhere.”

The branch is independent from the national charity, receiving no funding from the government or the Lottery, so rely on donations and fundraising events.

Its summer fair will be held on Saturday, September 9 from 11am with cakes, face painting, a special appearance from cocker spaniel Guinness who the RSPCA team helped after he was found collapsed in Grays last year, and more to raise the vital funds.

To find out how you can become a fosterer or for more information on the branch, visit rspca.org.uk/local/essex-havering-and-harold-hill-branch/


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