Tributes paid to 'generous' voluntary group founder

 Susan Freeman, Debbie Broom, Mary Scott, Peter Scott smile as they cut a cake

Tributes have been paid to Peter Scott (right), who founded Havering Group Diabetes UK. He celebrated the group's 40th anniversary with left to right: Susan Freeman, Debbie Broom and Mary Scott. - Credit: David Squibb

Tributes have been paid to the founder and long-serving chairman of a Havering voluntary group who has died.

Peter Scott, 78, formed Havering Group Diabetes UK in 1979. 

He leaves behind his 77-year-old wife Mary, who he married in 1971, their two children Paul, 46, and 44-year-old Keith, as well as four grandchildren.   

Peter, who had Type 1 diabetes, helped to raise more than £80,000 for charity Diabetes UK.  

Secretary of Havering Group Diabetes UK, Ann Prescott, said: “Without Peter forming a group for people living with diabetes back in 1979, many people with the condition would have struggled alone and for this we are truly grateful to Peter. 


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“Havering Group Diabetes UK lives on in his memory over 40 years later.” 

Peter’s memorial service was held on June 2 at St. Andrew’s Church in Hornchurch. The cremation took place at South Essex Crematorium. 

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His son Paul said that his dad “went in to the theme of Match of the Day and was taken out to the BBC cricket theme song, Soul Limbo”.  

He added: “My dad was generous, warm, funny and sporty.

"He had a wonderful sense of humour and he was always one that people loved to talk to.” 

Peter, from Upminster, worked in shipping and freight forwarding and took part in volunteering and charity work alongside this, something which Paul said he “will always remember”. 

Peter would support his sons when they joined Upminster Hockey Club, where Paul said he would “drive between matches to encourage them”. 

His volunteering included working with St. Andrew's Church at its Messy Church, parish office and the pop-up café called The Bridge, which helped those who have been bereaved.   

In 2012 Peter volunteered at the Olympics – where he was “proudly” a London ambassador, while he also volunteered at the Oval cricket ground and as a guide at the Upminster Windmill Museum.   

Even in his 50s, he would turn out for Paul's 5th XI at Upminster Cricket Club when they were short on numbers. 

Paul said: “A few years later, he was a qualified umpire and well respected at the club.”

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