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Numbers of pubs in Havering fall by 20%

PUBLISHED: 15:21 19 April 2017 | UPDATED: 12:47 20 April 2017

Residents in Harold Hill protesting against the Pompadours pub closing. Picture: Archant.

Residents in Harold Hill protesting against the Pompadours pub closing. Picture: Archant.

Archant

The number of pubs across the borough has fallen by 20 per cent since 2001, according to statistics released today.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan. Picture: Ken Mears.London Mayor Sadiq Khan. Picture: Ken Mears.

Calling locals the capital’s “cultural gems” London mayor Sadiq Khan has pledged to make it harder for pubs to shut.

Across London 1,220 pubs have been lost in the last 15 years and in Havering have fallen 20 per cent – from 85 to 65.

“The great British pub is at the heart the capital’s culture,” he said.

“From traditional working men’s clubs to cutting-edge micro-breweries, London’s locals are as diverse and eclectic as the people who frequent them.

“That’s why I’m shocked at the rate of closure highlighted by these statistics, and why we have partnered with the Campaign for Real Ale (Camra) to ensure we can track the number of pubs open in the capital and redouble our efforts to stem the rate of closures.”

Alan Barker, secretary of Camra’s South West Essex Branch, named micropub Upminster TapRoom, Sunnyside Gardens, Upminster, as pub of the year last month.

Bob Knowles and Caroline Sheldon (central) celebrate the Upminster TapRoom's inclusion in CAMRA's Good Beer Guide 2017.Bob Knowles and Caroline Sheldon (central) celebrate the Upminster TapRoom's inclusion in CAMRA's Good Beer Guide 2017.

He named housing development as one of the primary causes of pubs closing.

“Property values are quite high and pubs have car parks where you can build eight houses instead of running just one pub,” he said.

“Mason’s Arms, St Mary’s Lane, Upminster, is now houses with gardens.”

Last year, people rallied round The Pompadours, Edenhall Road, Harold Hill, to try to stop it form closure but were unsuccessful.

“Pubs are places for people to meet together in a way that they probably would not be able to,” continued Alan.

“Upminster TapRoom is a good example. It’s a new generation of micropub but is less likely to be targeted for housing.

“Because it’s quite small you can’t really build very much on it.”

The pub audit forms the first strand of the mayor’s Cultural Infrastructure Plan for 2030 which looks at what London needs to sustain its future as a cultural capital.

London’s night czar, Amy Lamé, has also launched a public consultation.

“As an American who came to live in London over 20 years ago, I immediately fell in love with London’s pub culture,” she said.

“Running a pub of my own, I understand just how important they are to the life and spirit of a community.”

The consultation is open until May 31. To take part visit london.gov.uk/closingtime.


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