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Three and Havering College teacher assure safety of 5G mast planned for Harold Hill

PUBLISHED: 17:00 02 June 2020 | UPDATED: 17:00 02 June 2020

Three says that in Harold Hill, there is an “acute need”  for a new 5G mast. Picture: WHP Telecoms

Three says that in Harold Hill, there is an “acute need” for a new 5G mast. Picture: WHP Telecoms

WHP Telecoms

Plans for a 5G telephone mast are under way in Gooshays Drive, Harold Hill.

Three has submitted plans for a 20 metre 5G mast in Gooshays Drive. Picture: WHP TelecomsThree has submitted plans for a 20 metre 5G mast in Gooshays Drive. Picture: WHP Telecoms

Telecoms company Three has submitted an application, currently undecided, for a 20m mast as part of its national 5G rollout this year.

According to the application, the mast is a requirement to improve coverage and capacity for 5G, which now the most in demand phone frequency.

To host 5G, higher radio frequencies are needed and different antenna and equipment installed. Some masts can be upgraded to support it, other areas need new sites altogether.

Three says that in Harold Hill, there is an “acute need” for a new mast.

Three also says the site in Gooshays has been selected because of the “numerous vertical elements of street furniture” or abundant trees and lampposts, meaning it will fit with the current landscape.

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Answering 5G mast health concerns, Robert Finnegan, Three UK CEO, said: “There is absolutely no link between 5G and coronavirus. The 5G rollout by all UK mobile network operators complies with all global standards on health and safety which have been developed since the early 1990s – tested independently by Ofcom.”

And Havering College’s deputy curriculum director of automotive & engineering, Sunny Bamra added: “The new cellular technology has spawned a set of conspiracy theories, with everything ranging from the idea that 5G can cause cancer to the claim that it is behind Covid-19.”

Mr Bamra explained that the false claim that 5G masts are related to coronavirus could be because China deployed one of the largest 5G networks in the world and that made the news around early January.

He said: “Research has shown that Covid-19 spreads through droplets generated by sneezes or coughs. These droplets can exist on surfaces for a matter of hours, and can even hang in the air for up to a few minutes after someone sneezes.

“Radio waves, however, are a form of electromagnetic wave. No droplets involved.”

A Three spokesperson added: “Access to 5G has a vital role to play in boosting local economies, helping residents and businesses get faster and more reliable network coverage.

“This is why we’re working with local councils to roll out the UK’s fastest 5G network so that we can keep everyone connected both now and in the future.”

There is not date yet for when the decision will be made about whether or not to allow the mast in Harold Hill.


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