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Judy Murray rallies in Gidea Park to boost tennis participation

PUBLISHED: 13:00 10 March 2017 | UPDATED: 13:24 10 March 2017

Judy Murray with David Lloyd junior members.

Judy Murray with David Lloyd junior members.

Archant

Judy Murray came to Gidea Park on Thursday, March 9 to deliver a training workshop to teach parents how they can help their children develop their tennis skills.

The mum of world number one, Sir Andy Murray, delivered the session at David Lloyd Gidea Park, Squirrels Heath Lane, as part of her new role as a coach consultant to the health and leisure company.

Both parents and children took part in the junior masterclass, and afterwards Judy spoke of the important role parents play in helping their children to develop their sporting ability.

She told the Recorder: “We had a great time with the kids. If anything, it was more for the parents to show them how they can help the children develop the skills you need to play something like tennis.

“If they can be doing those exercises for 10 minutes a day, the children will soon develop the skills they need to get better.

“The kids had a great time, kids love playing with their parents and the parents enjoyed playing with them.

“They can see how they can help their children to develop in tennis just by doing activities with them using items they might have lying around their house.”

Judy has also been imparting her knowledge, from her time coaching her sons and as captain of Great Britain’s Fed Cup team, to the club’s coaches to help them to improve.

“What we are trying to do is build a stronger workforce and to share a lot of ideas of the ways the coaches in the David Lloyd Clubs can enhance and develop their programmes,” Judy said. “From beginners to performers, from little kids to adults, really it’s all about sharing our philosophy and our way of coaching.”

Judy recently launched the She Rallies initiative with the aim of boosting female participation in sport and said that it is harder to get young girls into sport because it’s not always female friendly.

“We have to work hard, like all sports do, to make our sport as fun and stimulating as we can for girls.

“That was one of the reasons I developed my Miss Hits programme, which is for girls aged five to eight. But we also need more female coaches because female coaches better understand how girls tick.”

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