Search

More than 200 people pay their respects at Remembrance service at new Harold Wood memorial

PUBLISHED: 11:29 13 November 2018 | UPDATED: 11:29 13 November 2018

More than 200 people attended the first Remembrance service at the new memorial in Harold Wood. Councillors Brian Eagling, Martin Goode and Darren Wise with members of the armed forces and Hornchurch and Upminster sea cadets. Photo: Sandra Rowse

More than 200 people attended the first Remembrance service at the new memorial in Harold Wood. Councillors Brian Eagling, Martin Goode and Darren Wise with members of the armed forces and Hornchurch and Upminster sea cadets. Photo: Sandra Rowse

Photo: Sandra Rowse

More than 200 people paid their respects to fallen war heroes at the first Remembrance service held at the new memorial in Harold Wood.

A sea cadet and marine from Hornchurch and Upminster lay a wreath at the Remembrance service in Harold Wood at the weekend. Photo: Sandra RowseA sea cadet and marine from Hornchurch and Upminster lay a wreath at the Remembrance service in Harold Wood at the weekend. Photo: Sandra Rowse

The stone cross memorial that now stands in front of the library in Arundel Road was unveiled last week, and members of the Harold Wood Royal British Legion, the Upminster and Hornchurch sea cadets and Major Purvez Bhadhuddin from Romford all laid wreaths at the service on Sunday (November 11).

Councillor Brian Eagling said: “I can’t believe how many people came.

“I couldn’t have asked for a better turnout, it was amazing.

“It was such a lovely day

Councillor Brian Eagling laying at wreath at the service in Harold Wood on Sunday. Photo: Sandra RowseCouncillor Brian Eagling laying at wreath at the service in Harold Wood on Sunday. Photo: Sandra Rowse

“I was over the moon, and the service was brilliant.

“I can’t thank everyone enough.”

Harold Wood resident Alex Donald said: “I was honoured to be part of Harold Wood’s first Remembrance service at the new war memorial.

“The service commemorating those taken by war and conflict was all the more poignant being the Centenary of World War One.

“With well over 150 people in attendance and eleven wreaths laid, I reflected on the sacrifices made by soldiers and civilians caught up in that and the many wars between then and now.

“I can’t with all honesty say that we have learnt or will ever learn the lessons of war – I doubt we ever will. Unfortunately.

“One of the things we can do is to support those soldiers affected physically and mentally from active combat, and their families.

“However, for the countless souls cut down in the trenches and other pointless theatres of war: We will remember them…but I wish we didn’t need to.”

There was also a bugler, and the sea cadets performed a salute to commemorate 100 years since the end of World War One.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Romford Recorder

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists