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NHS 70: Cancer patient pays tribute to National Health Service’s life-saving heroes

PUBLISHED: 14:00 05 July 2018 | UPDATED: 16:51 16 July 2018

Rosemary Taylor is grateful to the nurses at King George's and Queen's Hospitals for looking after her during her treatment for breast cancer. Pic: KEN MEARS

Rosemary Taylor is grateful to the nurses at King George's and Queen's Hospitals for looking after her during her treatment for breast cancer. Pic: KEN MEARS

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A cancer patient has paid tribute to the hospital staff helping her fight the disease on the NHS’s 70th birthday.

Cancer patient Rosemary Taylor has paid tribute the staff of King George Hospital and Queen's Hospital on the NHS's 70th anniversary. Pic: Rosemary TaylorCancer patient Rosemary Taylor has paid tribute the staff of King George Hospital and Queen's Hospital on the NHS's 70th anniversary. Pic: Rosemary Taylor

Rosemary Taylor, of Valence Wood Road, Dagenham, was diagnosed with breast cancer last August after she found a lump she first thought was an insect bite.

After two biopsies, her doctor broke the news that her left breast would have to be removed.

“When he told me I broke down and cried. I was in a state. It was just a shock,” Miss Taylor said.

The 54-year-old – who lost her dad Charles and sister Pam to cancer – underwent an operation in March.

“I was sick as a dog for days afterwards,” she said.

But Miss Taylor, a carer for her mum Lucy for 14 years until she passed away three years ago, said she could not make it through without the help of staff from Queen’s Hospital, Romford, and King George Hospital, Goodmayes.

“They were there for me. Nothing was too much trouble,” she said.

Miss Taylor, who suffers from depression, added the encouragement of one nurse dedicated to her care pulled her through the really tough times.

“She always says I am doing brilliantly and that really helps me. She cheers me up and makes me laugh. I trust her,” she said.

Miss Taylor – who raised £200 for charity Cancer Research UK before her surgery – paid tribute to the NHS on July 5 the day it celebrated its 70th anniversary.

“If I didn’t have them I don’t know what would happen. I really am grateful. If I had to pay I couldn’t do it,” she said.

Although she is still taking medication and may need another operation, she does not have to face it alone.

“The nurses and doctors who treat me have been great,” she said.

The National Health Service began on July 5 1948. When it started it was the first healthcare service in the world that was free at the point of delivery.

To mark its special day celebration events are taking place across the country, including a Westminster Abbey service attended by staff from across the NHS.

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