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Life coaching gave Gidea Park mum new perspective

PUBLISHED: 12:00 15 June 2014

Kim is a life coach who has changed her life around.

Kim is a life coach who has changed her life around.

Archant

Depressed and drinking anything to numb her brain, a mum-of-two knew she needed to turn her life around.

Kim with mum Melody, 67, before she turned her life aroundKim with mum Melody, 67, before she turned her life around

Kim Wymer, of Scholars Way, Gidea Park, was a “goth” who didn’t like herself or anybody else but has now managed to change her perspective on life and is mentoring others on how to do the same.

The 47-year-old told the Recorder about the lows she reached and how she conquered her demons.

“I had a drinking problem. I relied on it every day because it kept me happy,” she said. “I needed it as drinking gives you a buzz but the next day you are depressed and hungover and can’t wait for the next drink.

“I was putting it under my bed, hiding it from my children.”

Kim was trying to run her own furniture restoration business as well as holding down a job, starting at 5am every day, at Asda.

She was also divorcing her husband of 18 years and had no one to turn to.

“I was in an unhappy marriage for a long time and finally filed for divorce.

“My sister was my best friend but got the go ahead to emigrate to Australia.

“A few months later my parents decided they wanted to retire to Spain. This was when I needed my family most. I was on the edge.”

At this point she decided she needed change and the only person who could help her was herself. She started to read self-help books and came across Love Live, Live Life by life coach Sue Stone.

“That’s what got the ball rolling,” Kim said.

The book slowly taught her to think positively and to be confident. She then took a massive step forward.

“I emailed her Sue and she said she was looking for new coaches. I remember thinking how lovely it would be to be a coach.”

Kim was incredibly nervous but decided to go for it and studied with Sue to become a “positive empowerment coach” in 2012.

She trained in one of Sue’s programmes and then started to give talks.

“For me to give talks is amazing in itself. That scared the hell out of me.”

But she came on in leaps and bounds and in January set up Happy Days Coaching, her own sessions.

She teaches people to have a positive outlook and believes in return good things will come to them.

“I can give them a good positive outlook so they don’t have to go through the traumas I did,” she said.

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