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Hornchurch mum’s bets fundraiser helps tackle kidney disease

PUBLISHED: 08:12 29 July 2015 | UPDATED: 09:17 29 July 2015

Dr Kieran McCafferty and Julie Crick

Dr Kieran McCafferty and Julie Crick

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A West Ham fan who had a successful kidney transplant has raised funds for hospital equipment by creating a football betting syndicate.

Julie Crick, of Hornchurch, has been inviting 30 fans of the beautiful game to predict weekly results in aid of the Royal London Hospital, where she underwent a kidney transplant 13 years ago.

Each bet costs £2 with 35 per cent of the money raised donated to the hospital and the rest to the lucky winner.

She said: “We used to make bets just as a family but as more people wanted to get involved, the bigger it got.

“It can be a lot of hard work organising it but, it’s good because instead of just asking people for money, they actually get a chance of winning some!”

The mum-of-two underwent the transplant after she was diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease and started fundraising for charities in 2012 to mark the 10th anniversary of the procedure.

Her father died at the age of 55 from the condition as well as her uncle at 42.

Three of Julie’s sisters also have the disease as does one of her children.

The Royal London Hospital will be spending some of the money donated on further research into improving survival rates of those with kidney disease.

Julie has raised more than £10,000 for different kidney research charities over 10 years.

Dr Kieran McCafferty, nephrology consultant at Barts Health NHS Trust, said: “We’re fortunate to have world-leading research teams and facilities right here at The Royal London Hospital, meaning that funds raised by people such as Julie really is helping to change the lives of sufferers.”

Julie has so far raised about £1,000 which will go towards new clinical equipment.

She said: “It is so important that we fund this vital research to better understand the many causes of chronic kidney disease, diagnose people earlier to offer help and ultimately find a cure.

“I am incredibly grateful for the brilliant care of the hospital and the wonderful life that my transplant has given me.

“I feel very lucky.”


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