Search

Dramatic plan to combat A&E numbers at Queen’s Hospital gets two week trial

PUBLISHED: 10:00 09 July 2016

Queen's Hospital's A&E department

Queen's Hospital's A&E department

Archant

For two weeks people arriving at Queen’s Hospital’s A&E department who do not require emergency treatment will be redirected to other health providers.

From Monday arrivals between 8am and 8pm will be checked over by a doctor on arrival and, if they can be treated elsewhere, they will asked to go to another service.

Children aged 16 and under will not be affected.

The trial, which finishes on Friday July 22, follows a one day pilot in May, which found that one third of attendees could have been treated elsewhere.

Emergency department (ED) consultant Akin Idowu said: “Running the department in this way allows us to care for those most in need. We know that many people come to our EDs when they do not need emergency care.

“If they went to the right place in the community, it would be much more convenient for them.

“This trial will allow us to redirect people so they are cared for in the right place, and educate them about the options available to them.”

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust, which runs Queen’s Hospital, has conducted research into the way residents access health care.

It says: “Barking and Dagenham, Havering and Redbridge residents live in one of the most challenged health and social care economies in the country when it comes to the quality of services and the finances available to deliver them.

“Transforming the way we provide urgent and emergency care is one of the core priorities of health and social care partners across the area.”

Thousands of people across the three boroughs took part in a survey which revealed that 39 per cent of those questioned did not seek advice before going to A&E.

Of those that did seek advice 87pc said they were told to go to A&E.

In response the trust has suggested measures including improving the local 111 service to provide specialist advice and to ensure it directs patients to the appropriate service.

The survey also found that long waits were not a deterrent as A&E is seen as a reliable 24/7 service while patients may have to wait for a GP appointment.

In March BHRUT reported its busiest ever day when 830 people attended the A&E departments of Queen’s Hospital, Rom Valley Way, Romford and King George Hospital, Barley Lane, Goodmayes.

BHRUT has said it will monitor the impact of the scheme on GPS and other services, which will help plan future services for the boroughs,

It reminds residents that A&E is for people with life threatening illnesses or injuries.

Full information on getting the right care is available on the Trust’s website.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Romford Recorder. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Latest from the Romford Recorder