A&E at Queen’s Hospital, Romford, receives 110 ambulances a day - more than any other unit in London

Ambulances queue outside Queen's Hospital A&E. Picture: Sandra Rowse

Ambulances queue outside Queen's Hospital A&E. Picture: Sandra Rowse - Credit: Archant

Queen’s Hospital’s troubled A&E department receives 110 ambulances a day, new data show – more than any other casualty unit in London.

Queen’s Hospital’s A&E department receives 110 ambulances a day, new data show – more than any other casualty unit in London.

The figure, for the year 2012/13, represents a 15 per cent hike compared with 2011/12.

Ambulances account for a fraction of the traffic to casualty units, which typically see thousands of patients through the door each week.

But the revelation the troubled Queen’s A&E has experienced London’s biggest increase in ambulance referrals this year raises questions about how London Ambulance Service (LAS) decides where to take acutely ill patients.


You may also want to watch:


A&E units at neighbouring King George and Whipps Cross Hospitals saw an increase in ambulance traffic of 2 per cent apiece.

LAS’s assistant director of operations Paul Gates explained: “Queen’s is the only A&E department in the borough. The nearest alternative, King George, does not accept certain patients – for example, paediatrics and maternity patients.”

Most Read

In 2012/13, LAS took nearly 40,000 people to the Romford hospital, whose A&E was revealed last month to be London’s slowest.

Last week, 90.6 per cent of its patients were seen within the government’s four-hour target for A&E-goers.

The Department of Health expects hospitals to see at least 95 per cent of visitors within that time.

Chief executive Averil Dongworth said: “Reducing waits for patients in the emergency department is our highest priority.

“We are working hard to recruit more permanent staff. There is a national shortage of A&E consultants, and we know using locums to cover shifts can affect productivity.

“Dedicated work to improve the situation has seen our vacancy rate for emergency care staff drop from 45pc to 18pc in recent months.”

Mr Gates said LAS had received nearly 2,000 (17pc) more calls from Havering people needing urgent care in 2012/13 than 2011/12.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus