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Harold Hill army veteran chains himself to 4kg medicine ball to raise awareness about mental health

PUBLISHED: 12:00 24 January 2020 | UPDATED: 12:06 24 January 2020

Scott Squibb from Gallows Corner will be carrying around the medicine ball for seven days to awareness about mental health. Picture: Scott Squibb

Scott Squibb from Gallows Corner will be carrying around the medicine ball for seven days to awareness about mental health. Picture: Scott Squibb

Archant

A former soldier from Harold Hill hopes to start more conversations about mental health by taking part in a seven day medicine ball challenge.

Scott Squibb from Gallows Corner will be carrying around the medicine ball for seven days to awareness about mental health. Picture: Scott SquibbScott Squibb from Gallows Corner will be carrying around the medicine ball for seven days to awareness about mental health. Picture: Scott Squibb

Scott Squibb, 33, served in Afghanistan from 2014 to 2015.

His personal struggles with mental health issues inspired him to take part in Andrew Unwin's seven day medicine ball challenge.

From Monday, January 20 to Sunday, January 26, Scott will be handcuffed to a chain with a medicine ball.

He told the Recorder: "It's a 4kg medicine ball and the chain is about 2kg.

The medicine ball has stickers on it to raise awareness about mental health issues. Picture: Scott SquibbThe medicine ball has stickers on it to raise awareness about mental health issues. Picture: Scott Squibb

"It represents the weight that veterans carry around with them.

"Nobody knows the weight you might be carrying on your shoulders and the challenge tries to visually show people the effect it can on have on their daily lives."

Scott can only remove the handcuff when driving, sleeping or if he needs to use the facilities.

"When I came back from Afghanistan I was depressed," said Scott.

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"It took me a really long time to admit it. But the biggest step is admitting it."

At the end of the seven day challenge Scott will pass the ball on to another person.

So far the father-of-two said he had been receiving a lot of strange looks from people who spotted him carrying around the medicine ball.

Scott said: "It's led to a few chats with people about mental health, but a lot of people notice it's strange but they don't want to ask why I'm carrying it."

"Being able to talk to people - that's one of the barriers we want to try to break down."

Former soldier Andrew Unwin began the challenge in November 2018 when he got the idea to chain himself to a ball on International Men's Day.

Scott added: "We're trying to erase the mental health stigma in men and women.

"We want people to know that it's okay to ask for help. It's nothing to be ashamed of.

"With men particularly the number of people who is suffering is phenomenal.

"The truth is you're more of a man when you admit you have a problem and seek help."

To find out more about the seven day challenge visit facebook.com/warswithinthem.


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