Harold Hill pupils meet father of inspirational Malala at contest

Rashida Sillah, 9, pointing to her 'thank you' letter at the University of Birmingham. Photo: Verity

Rashida Sillah, 9, pointing to her 'thank you' letter at the University of Birmingham. Photo: Verity Hoffman/Broadford Primary School - Credit: Verity Hoffman/Broadford Primary School

Two primary school pupils, shortlisted for a national writing competition, enjoyed a trip to Birmingham to meet the father of the youngest Nobel prize winner.

Rashida Sillah, 9, pointing to her 'thank you' letter at the University of Birmingham. Photo: Verity

Rashida Sillah, 9, pointing to her 'thank you' letter at the University of Birmingham. Photo: Verity Hoffman/Broadford Primary School - Credit: Verity Hoffman/Broadford Primary School

Two primary school pupils, shortlisted for a national writing competition, enjoyed a trip to Birmingham to meet the father of the youngest Nobel Prize Laureate.

Joshua Ore and Rashida Silla of Broadford Primary School, Faringdon Avenue, Harold Hill also collected certificates for their “Thank You Letter” competition entries.

Run by Birmingham University, the children had to write a letter of thanks to someone special.

Headteacher Malcolm Drakes said: ”Joshua chose to write to his dad.

Rashida Sillah, 9, pointing to her 'thank you' letter at the University of Birmingham. Photo: Verity

Rashida Sillah, 9, pointing to her 'thank you' letter at the University of Birmingham. Photo: Verity Hoffman/Broadford Primary School - Credit: Verity Hoffman/Broadford Primary School


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“Joshua wanted to thank his dad for the way he has taken care of him and his brother Jamel."

“Rashida wanted to thank Jessie J for her music. The judges liked this letter because she was very creative with how she worked in lyrics from a selection on Jesse’s songs.”

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Rashida was one of the five primary finalists out of 41,000 entries and went on stage to collect her framed certificate and meet the hosts.

The guest speaker at the event, two weeks ago, was the father of Malala, who gave an inspiring speech into why showing gratitude is an important virtue.

Malala widely regarded as a courageous Pakistani advocate for women’s rights to education, who was shot in the head by the Taliban.

She survived to become and the youngest-ever Nobel Prize laureate and is widely recognised around the world.

Rashida said: “I am amazed that I made it to the final five.

“After reading the other letters, I could see how much effort other pupils had put into their entries and I feel honoured to have been recognised.”

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