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A Hornchurch school, which is in special measures, has improved after teaching changes

PUBLISHED: 10:45 21 November 2012

Langtons school, Westland Avenue, Hornchurch

Langtons school, Westland Avenue, Hornchurch

Archant

A Hornchurch school which was put into special measures earlier this year is now “improving” after an overhaul of teaching and gaining seven new teachers.

Langton’s Junior School, in Westland Avenue, was rated inadequate – the lowest rating – for its overall effectiveness; achievement of pupils; quality of teaching; and leadership and management in February.

Ofsted inspectors rated the behaviour and safety of the pupils as satisfactory during the full unannounced inspection.

The school was placed in special measures and the council had a greater control over the running of it, and training of staff until it improved.

Following a monitoring visit lead inspector Robert Lovett said the progress since the school went into special measures and since the last monitoring inspection was good.

The school has had seven new teachers, three of which are newly qualified. The report, which was published this week, said improvements were also down to the middle leadership of year leaders being restructured with three of the four new to the school and all new to their role. An inclusion manager started in September and there is a new chair of the governing body.

The report said the quality of teaching has improved “considerably” and more of it is at a “good” level, rather than in adequate.

As a result pupils are making better progress in lessons and their attainment has risen in reading, writing and maths.

He added: “When teachers themselves exude excitement and enthusiasm and communicate the fun of learning pupils respond very positively. The teachers continue to be reflective and eager to improve.

“They recognise where things have gone well and where their practice could be improved. All teachers are eager to maintain the momentum for improvement.”

Pupils’ achievement is rising as a result, and more are reaching the nationally expected Level 4 in English and maths compared to the previous year.

Mr Lovett added that there a “particularly impressive” rise – almost half the pupils in English- reaching a Level 5, which is “well above the national average”.

Inspectors were also impressed with new pupil progress meetings, which they said were “an effective way of identifying those pupils at risk of underachievement and making sure they quickly get the right help”.


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