Skilled builder and joiner left gravely disabled following wrong diagnosis by Romford hospital

Queen's Hospital

Queen's Hospital - Credit: Archant

A highly-skilled man who suffered a devastating stroke following an incorrect hospital diagnosis is set to receive a multi-million pound NHS payout.

Paul Wiggins, of Great Holland, near Clacton-on-Sea, was left gravely disabled after suffering a brain haemorrhage in April 2009, while being treated at the Queen’s Hospital, Romford.

The 53-year-old - formerly a skilled joiner and builder - now needs round-the-clock care and is totally dependent on others.

Through his wife, Maxine - who was today praised by a High Court judge for her “devotion” to him - Mr Wiggins sued the Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust, which runs the hospital.

The trust admitted liability and agreed to settle the case by paying a lump sum of £1.66m, which will be largely used to provide suitable accommodation for Mr Wiggins.


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He will also receive annual, index-linked and tax-free payments of £125,000, rising to £127,000 from 2018.

The settlement was today approved at London’s High Court by Mr Justice Holroyde, who said he was “satisfied” the deal reached was in Mr Wiggins’ best interests.

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The judge told the court that, prior to his stroke, Mr Wiggins was an “immensely practical man”, whose skilled work often earned him praise.

In April 2009, he was admitted to hospital after suffering two brain haemorrhages as a result of an aneurysm.

The judge said that, had his condition been correctly diagnosed at that stage, he would have made a full recovery.

However, it was not and he suffered a further haemorrhage - which caused “severe and permanent” brain damage.

Neil Block QC representing the trust, issued a public apology on its behalf and paid tribute to the devoted care Mr Wiggins’ wife, her mother and other family members have provided.

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