Met Police launches video campaign to raise awareness of domestic abuse

The video highlights the differences between physical and psychological domestic abuse.

The video highlights the differences between physical and psychological domestic abuse. - Credit: Met Police

The Met Police has launched a video campaign to raise awareness of domestic abuse and encourage victims to seek help and support.

The campaign coincides with 16 days of focused activity around domestic abuse which commenced on the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women (Sunday, 25 November).

The two short videos feature scenarios which illustrate typical behaviours of both victims and abusers in relation to physical abuse and coercive control; the latter often being overlooked as a form of domestic abuse.

The purpose is to convey the message to victims that “you are not alone” and to encourage them to “tell someone.”

They also highlight the other medical professionals and partner agencies who can offer support alongside the police.

The video highlights the differences between physical and psychological domestic abuse.

The video highlights the differences between physical and psychological domestic abuse. - Credit: Met Police


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The videos, which are supported by Women’s Aid, Refuge, NHS England and the London Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, will be played in GP surgeries across London.

The activity runs in addition to similar work carried out throughout the year under Operation Dauntless – the Met’s focus on and commitment to reducing violence against women and girls.

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Zena, who in 2016 was assaulted by her ex-husband and has watched the two videos, said: “It’s good to put out a message that domestic abuse is more than just physical abuse; in my experience the controlling and following was the worst. People may not realise that messaging and turning up unannounced is abuse so I think it’s great that the police are sending the message that abuse isn’t just physical.

“I suffered domestic abuse for a long time and I only realised it through the experiences of others.

The video highlights the differences between physical and psychological domestic abuse.

The video highlights the differences between physical and psychological domestic abuse. - Credit: Met Police

“The best thing I ever did was report it to police after I left an abusive relationship. It has taken me a long time to get back to a good place.

Detective Chief Inspector Richard Vandenbergh, who came up with the idea to create the videos, said: “Domestic abuse is more than just violence. It is also the psychological and emotional abuse from a partner, which can traumatise the victim.

“These videos clearly show this and I hope give a rounded view of what a victim could be going through. I hope these videos strike a chord with those who might be experiencing domestic abuse, and encourage them to come forward and report it so they can be fully supported, not only by the police but by other charities and partner agencies.

“I also hope that these videos raise awareness amongst the public, so they are able to spot the signs in others going through it and help them.

“This is just a small part of what the MPS is doing to tackle domestic abuse and we continue to be fully committed to safeguarding victims and bringing perpetrators to justice.”

Katie Ghose, Chief Executive of Women’s Aid, said: “From our work with survivors, we know that for many women their doctor’s surgery or hospital might be the only place where they are alone and feel safe enough to disclose their experience of domestic abuse, especially coercive and controlling behaviour. Health professionals, like GPs or nurses, can play a huge role in ensuring that survivors get the support they need to escape this form of abuse.

“This campaign by the MPS will help send out the powerful message to survivors that they are not alone and there is help out there for them – whether the abuse is physical or mental. By working together, the police, NHS and specialist agencies can give the right response to survivors of coercive and controlling behaviour to help them rebuild their life free from fear and abuse.”

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