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Teenagers in schools to be taught what to do if someone has been stabbed after rise in knife crime

PUBLISHED: 12:00 29 March 2019

Similar sessions have taken place in Redbridge, and the Red Cross have been carrying out first aid training in the event of a knife attack.

Similar sessions have taken place in Redbridge, and the Red Cross have been carrying out first aid training in the event of a knife attack.

Archant

Teenagers as young as 13 are being taught how to deliver first aid and deal with stab injuries following a rise in knife crime in Havering.

Similar sessions have taken place in Redbridge, and the Red Cross have been carrying out first aid training in the event of a knife attack.Similar sessions have taken place in Redbridge, and the Red Cross have been carrying out first aid training in the event of a knife attack.

A group of volunteer medical students and junior doctors, called StreetDoctors, are teaching young people how to stem bleeding, techniques to keep calm and to call 999 for help.

In Havering all secondary schools were sent a letter by the council’s community safety team to offer free first aid training sessions to pupils aged 13 to 18, with emphasis on those most likely to be at risk of violence, such as young people who regularly go missing or those who are known or believed to be involved in drugs.

The main reason for the course is part of the public health response to an increase in knife crime here that is mirrored in other London boroughs, and so far six sessions have been held training 53 young people first aid.

The Safer Neighbourhoods Board gave £8,000 funding for the sessions which was originally provided by the Mayor’s Office for Policing and Crime.

The funding is to deliver 40 sessions to secondary schools across the borough, pupil referral units and youth offending services.

StreetDoctors delivers sessions across London, and its main aim is to reduce the number of young people who die or are injured as a result of youth violence, to reduce the likelihood of young people at risk engaging in youth violence and to increase the likelihood of young people at risk making positive choices that benefit their own and others’ well-being.

Councillor Viddy Persaud, cabinet member for public protection and safety, said: “Sessions like these are important in talking frankly to our young people about violent crime.

“People listen to the young doctors and surgeons giving this training and it also makes people who might otherwise take a knife out with them – even if only for protection – think again.

W”e cannot shy away from such difficult topics because from Harrow to Havering to Harlow violent crime is increasing and this is just one part of the way we are committed to tackling it.

“It is still unlikely that you will witness a violent attack and less likely still you will be the victim of one, but knowing what to do if the worst happens is something I think our children need to hear about.”

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