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Upminster amateur astronomer captures 'super blood wolf moon' from his back garden

PUBLISHED: 15:04 22 January 2019 | UPDATED: 15:19 22 January 2019

The lunar eclipse captured by Upminster astonomer Les Brand yesterday. Photo: Les Brand

The lunar eclipse captured by Upminster astonomer Les Brand yesterday. Photo: Les Brand

Les Brand

A stargazer from Upminster captured the unusual lunar eclipse being called the "super blood wolf moon" from his back garden.

Les captured the lunar eclipse from his back garden in Upminster. Photo: Les BrandLes captured the lunar eclipse from his back garden in Upminster. Photo: Les Brand

Les Brand, who is a member of the Havering Astronomical Society, was out in his garden in the freezing cold from around 3am yesterday (Monday, January 21) to capture the spectacle.

The eclipse, known as a “super blood wolf moon”, is when the moon appears to glow red while seeming brighter and closer to Earth than normal.

The event was initially visible from North and South America, as well as areas of western Europe - and Les got a great view of it from Upminster.

Les captured the lunar eclipse from his back garden in Upminster. Photo: Les BrandLes captured the lunar eclipse from his back garden in Upminster. Photo: Les Brand

He told the Recorder: “The first photo was taken at about 3.30 and the last one was at 5.30

“It certainly was a spectacle, but I wasn’t using any fancy equipment or anything.

“It was freezing but it was definitely worth it.”

Les captured the lunar eclipse from his back garden in Upminster. Photo: Les BrandLes captured the lunar eclipse from his back garden in Upminster. Photo: Les Brand

The next total lunar eclipse is expected in two years, on 26 May 2021.

This kind of eclipse occurs when the Earth passes precisely between the Sun and the Moon.

In this situation, the Sun is behind the Earth, and the Moon moves into the Earth’s shadow.

The event gets the “super” part of its name from the fact that the Moon will be near its closest approach to the Earth - when it will be marginally bigger in the sky than usual.

The “wolf” part comes from the name given to full moons in January - “wolf moons”.

Les said the group is always look for new members and for anyone who is interested in joining to go to their website.

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