Remembrance Day: Harold Hill youngsters produce poignant painting to commemorate First World War soldiers

The painting produced by Broadford Primary School pupils to commemorate the centenary of the First W

The painting produced by Broadford Primary School pupils to commemorate the centenary of the First World War - Credit: Archant

Three soldiers stand surrounded by a field of poppies, guns held high while storm clouds gather above them.

The painting produced by Broadford Primary School pupils to commemorate the centenary of the First W

The painting produced by Broadford Primary School pupils to commemorate the centenary of the First World War - Credit: Archant

This bold painting was produced by children at Broadford Primary School, as part of their activities to mark the centenary of the First World War.

Melvyn Vumuka, nine, was one of those who took part.

He said: “We wanted to create a picture that was a happy memory. Lots of the photos we have looked at showed men smiling as they left for the war.

“However, the dark sky at the top was coloured to show the death that so many suffered.”


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George White, also nine, said: “My favourite part of the picture is the silhouette of the three soldiers.

“I think they look like ghosts coming over the hill. In one of the stories that we read, the soldiers’ spirits were wandering the battlefields trying to get home.”

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Youngsters from the school, in Faringdon Avenue, Harold Hill, have also been studying the conflict through other means.

They have been participating in a reading medal challenge, which requires them to read five books from the library (fiction or non-fiction) about the First World War.

They will be attending a special assembly on Armistice Day.

They have also visited the Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red ceramic poppy installation at the Tower of London.

Sophie Nickson, nine, went on the trip.

She said: “I couldn’t believe that so many people had died. But the poppies looked so pretty and we tried to capture that in our artwork.”

Headteacher Malcolm Drakes said: “Trying to ­explain to the children what life was like 100 years ago is a real challenge.

“However, the coverage of the centennial, the poppy­ ­installation in London and the recent conflicts in the news have created a lot of interest amongst the pupils.

“We talk all the time about ­reflecting on their work and what could be done better; how they can learn from their mistakes. If this leads them to reflect on how a conflict could be avoided, then it has been a very worthy exercise.”

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