Exhibition reveals 100 years of transport in Havering

A steam train on its way to Romford from Norwich was a regular sight in the 1960s.

A steam train on its way to Romford from Norwich was a regular sight in the 1960s. - Credit: Archant

An exciting exhibition telling the history of transport through the ages in Havering is launched next week.

The shops in Market Place in 1917 include Harry's Cycles Stores.
Owner Harry Sibley stands between

The shops in Market Place in 1917 include Harry's Cycles Stores. Owner Harry Sibley stands between the shops, with his two children in front of the cycle store. Credit: Bygone Havering by Brian Evans. - Credit: Archant

Havering on the Move reveals how we travelled in carts and carriages, and horse-drawn buses that linked Rainham with the East End.

Local thrill-seekers go for a ride in an airborne freight car at Romford Station goods yard during t

Local thrill-seekers go for a ride in an airborne freight car at Romford Station goods yard during the Romford Railway Exhibition in June 1936. - Credit: Archant

It also includes the routemaster bus, rail links that brought prosperity to Romford and the District Line extension to Upminster.

The exhibition at Havering Museum, in High Street, Romford, marks the 150th anniversary of the London Underground and spans the past 100 years, looking at why trams and trolleybuses did not run in the borough, the taxis and emergency vehicles, and the history of Dagenham Dock.

It features photos, models of buses, trains, trams, and carriages that ran through the borough, a 1940s bus driver’s uniform, station signs, transport memorabilia and a film loaned by the London Transport Museum.


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Exhibitions’ co-ordinator Peter Stewart said: “The exhibition team have worked extremely hard over the past year to put on what is probably the most visually exciting project to date.

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“We have been supported by the London Transport Museum, the Ilford and West Essex Railway Club, volunteers and the people of Havering who have loaned us objects that have produced one of the best collections of its type ever assembled.”

Exhibitions’ team leader Matthew Abel said the railways helped industries like Romford Brewery to expand by transporting goods further and quicker, and allowed people to live locally and travel to work in London.

The emergence of the motor car led to Ford’s Dagenham plant which provided employment for many residents.

Mr Abel said: “The London Transport Museum has made a wonderful contribution to this exhibition. I really hope that people take this opportunity to come and see some of the fascinating material on display.”

Havering on the Move: The Story of Local Transport, runs from Saturday, October 5, to Saturday, November 30.

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