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Romford pictures: Havering commemorates 100 years since Britain joined the First World War

09:17 05 August 2014

A First World War centenary service was held outside the Hornchurch War Memorial. It was for four Maori soldiers who died in Hornchurch as well as the 211 Hornchurch men who died fighting in the war.

A First World War centenary service was held outside the Hornchurch War Memorial. It was for four Maori soldiers who died in Hornchurch as well as the 211 Hornchurch men who died fighting in the war.

Archant

The soldiers of the First World War, the fallen, the wounded and the survivors, were remembered by the borough at a number of commemorative events.

Yesterday (August 4) was 100 years to the day that Britain declared war on Germany and the community came together to remember all those who were involved in the conflict.

Hornchurch held its own service at 11am outside St Andrew’s Church, in High Street, which was organised by the president of the town’s Royal British Legion, Dave King, and the vicar of the church, Brian Hobson.

The event not only remembered the 211 Hornchurch men who died during the war, but also four Maori soldiers.

Privates Vasau, 22, Filitoua, 22, Taleva, 25, and rumoured royal prince Moki, 21, are buried at the church.

Queen's Hospital in Romford held a special tea and cake event for patients to remember the First World War and the Oldchurch hospital, which looked after people during the war. Violet Banks 98 from Ilford with (from left to right) Marion Ekpe HCA, Zahiya Reda HCA, Chief nurse Flo Panel-Coates and Sister of ward Natalie Fleming.Queen's Hospital in Romford held a special tea and cake event for patients to remember the First World War and the Oldchurch hospital, which looked after people during the war. Violet Banks 98 from Ilford with (from left to right) Marion Ekpe HCA, Zahiya Reda HCA, Chief nurse Flo Panel-Coates and Sister of ward Natalie Fleming.

They were among 102 Maoris who came from the island of Niue, in the South Pacific, to the New Zealand Convalescent Hospital at the Grey Towers mansion in 1916.

But many of them found it difficult to adjust to Britain’s climate and died from pneumonia.

Havering’s main service took place in the evening, at 7.30pm.

The multi-faith service, at St Edward’s Church, in the Market Place, Romford, was led by Father David Anderson and Rabbi Lee Sunderland.

Queen’s Hospital, in Rom Valley Way, held an event with a difference.

Staff laid on a special tea for patients and celebrated the role of Oldchurch Hospital - which was used as an auxiliary medical centre during the war.

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