Search

‘Troubled’ Havering family cost taxpayers £250,000 over two years

07:00 28 March 2014

Stats show Havering to be performing worse than its neighbouring boroughs in terms of families "turned around" by the halfway stage

Stats show Havering to be performing worse than its neighbouring boroughs in terms of families "turned around" by the halfway stage

Archant

Taxpayers have paid £250,000 for one family’s needs over two years, it has been revealed.

The money was spent on a host of local and national services providing support for issues such as drug and alcohol abuse, crime and anti-social behaviour, mental health, receiving work-related benefits, education and neglect.

The amount, which excludes police costs, was shelled-out betwen 2010-2012 to support one “large” family living in the borough.

According to national statistics released in 2011, the household cost taxpayers £50,000 more annually than the average £75,000 spent on a “troubled family.”

Havering Council would not specify which services the family required specifically, for fear of identication, but confirmed they are now being worked with under the government’s Troubled Families programme.

The scheme aims to “turn around” 120,000 high cost and high need households by 2015 by developing a lead-agency approach to services.

In 2011, Havering Council was tasked with identifying and working with 415 families for the scheme, which rewards council’s for successfully intervening.

Cllr Paul Rochford, cabinet member for children and learning, said: “This project has meant we can work more intensively with some of the most vulnerable families in the borough, helping them to tackle their issues and make their lives better for themselves and their children.

“This not only improves lives, it saves tax-payer money in the long-run.”

As of October 2013, the council had only succesfully “turned around” 34 of the 374 identified families, a lower percentage than Newham, Barking and Dagenham and Redbridge.

The programme offers support including parenting programmes, working with health agencies to deal with drug, alcohol and mental health issues, addressing education attendance, assisting with the debt management, addressing anti-social behaviour, advising on healthy eating and keeping a clean and tidy home.

Jonathan Isaby, chief executive of the TaxPayers’ Alliance, warned those that can not change their ways should not be entitled to “limitless support.”

He said: “It’s vital authorities do not allow an individual family to place too much of a burden on local taxpayers. This help cannot be unconditional.”

0 comments

Latest News Stories

Collapsed house in Collier Row

Neighbours have spoken of their horror after a house under refurbishment collapsed, saying it looks like a “bomb has gone off”.

12:27
Bedfords Park lake, where armed police patrolled on Monday

A driver who had two gunshot victims in his car flagged down passing police for help.

The car fire in Rush Green. Picture: Michael Christiansen

These dramatic shots show a car being consumed by a fireball in Rush Green last night.

Paul Hannaford's anti knife crime campaign

A former gang member is determined to warn teens against a life of crime.

Most read news

WW100

Click on the banner above for full coverage of the centenary commemorations of the outbreak of the First World War.

News from your area

Digital Edition

Image
Read the Romford Recorder e-edition today E-edition
Family Notices 24
Our trusted business finder

A man who was dubbed a ‘hot criminal’ has won a modelling contract.

Andrew Mitchell’s wallet is £80,000 lighter today, and his political reputation is in tatters.

His girlfriend has been charged with intending to pervert the course of justice.