Search

Respectable ways to celebrate Christmas in 19th century Havering

PUBLISHED: 09:18 24 December 2012 | UPDATED: 09:23 24 December 2012

Cllr Andrew Curtin

Cllr Andrew Curtin

Archant

In 1851 about 50 “respectable inhabitants” marked Christmas by attending the annual meeting of Romford Glee Club on December 29.

The Chelmsford Chronicle reported that “a number of admired glees were admirably given” by Messrs Hammond, Wheatley, Carter, A. Harvey, J. Day and others.

Mr Harvey in particular “excited much laughter by his comic efforts” and Mr Carter “gave ‘Jolly Christmas’ in excellent style”, all of which contributed to the party passing “a pleasant evening”.

Popular

Glees were a type of short song for trios or quartets which were popular in England in the 19th century. Glee clubs existed from the late 18th century.

A glee club was recorded at The Lamb Inn in Romford Market in 1806, though whether this is the same one referred to in 1851 is unknown.

Though we cannot be sure who the named gentlemen were, in an 1848 trade directory Hammonds were recorded as the publican at the Swan Inn, and a carpenter and publican at the Blucher’s Head, both in the market.

One Wheatley was a blacksmith in the market, and one a boot and shoemaker in the yard by St Edward’s Church.

There was a Carter who was a saddler, another a wine and spirit merchant/publican at the Coach and Bell Inn, both in the High Street, and another a baker in Waterloo Road.

Harveys ran newsagents and a library in the market, and booksellers in the High Street.

Christmas was not always peaceful. In 1868, villagers petitioned for the Christmas wrestling match for the boar’s head in Hornchurch to be abolished, saying it had become an unruly brawl.

In 1789, Havering magistrates banned a boxing match planned for an inn on December 21, fearing it would result in serious disorder.

They threatened publicans with having the army billeted on them if they ignored the ban.

On January 4, 1852, the South Essex Hunt met at North Ockendon.

In 1850, it was recorded as meeting at Wennington, Rainham and Hornchurch as well. The Essex Hunt met at Dagnams and Havering-atte-Bower.

From 1845, Rainham was the first known centre for coursing in Essex.

Christmas was also a time for charity.

In 1837, charities gave bread to the poor in Hornchurch and in 1787 five shillings and six pence was given to the poor in Hornchurch Work House for their Christmas box.

0 comments

Latest Romford News Stories

Yesterday, 17:00

Rats swarming in and out of bin bags, roaming confidently across front gardens and gnawing their way through fences – that is what residents of one Rainham street have found themselves up against.

Yesterday, 15:02

Fans can relive the unique musical talents of George Michael in a special tribute performance.

Yesterday, 12:19

Havering’s councillors look set to brand Sadiq Khan’s increased housing targets for the borough “unacceptable, unachieveable and unsustainable” at a meeting later this month.

Yesterday, 09:08

Medical failings stretching back more than two decades cost the NHS trust running Queen’s Hospital millions of pounds a year.

Yesterday, 08:13

An outspoken teenager from Romford is looking for two young people from the borough with mental health issues to take part in some mentoring sessions.

Mon, 17:00

A small Romford charity is celebrating their 20th anniversary with a special ball.

Mon, 16:30

Rail staff have shown their support for Havering Samaritans’ bid to turn “Blue Monday” into “Brew Monday”, by encouraging people to get together for a cup of tea and a chat.

Mon, 15:00

Havering Council cabinet members are set to discuss a proposed £30million grant from the GLA to pay for more affordable housing in the borough over the next three years.

PROMOTED CONTENT

Window and conservatory specialist Ken Rhodes talks about the possibilities for brightening up your home for the new year, and with their home improvement finance deals it’s possible for everyone to make some changes

Lisa and Jennie are cousins who grew up in the borough. Their grandmother, ‘Nanny Fish’ was a huge part of their lives, and while she had dementia and increasing needs, she really benefited from having care in her nephew’s loving home. This experience was the inspiration for Lisa and Jennie to set-up their own home care service.

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Most read news

Show Job Lists

News from your area

Competitions

Having a brand new kitchen is something that lots of people want but can only dream of. Sadly keeping up to date and making our living spaces as nice as they can be is a costly and incredibly stressful business. Even a fresh coat of paint makes all the difference but isn’t easy or quick.

Who wouldn’t love the chance to go on a shopping spree. Imagine being able to walk into a shop and choose whatever your heart desires without having to worry about how much it costs.

Digital Edition

cover

Enjoy the
Romford Recorder
e-edition today

Subscribe

Education and Training

cover

Read the
Education and Training
e-edition today

Read Now