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These four maps show how rich and poor of Havering live right next door to each other

PUBLISHED: 13:23 01 June 2017 | UPDATED: 13:31 01 June 2017

The least deprived areas of Havering are shown in yellow and the most deprived areas in red

The least deprived areas of Havering are shown in yellow and the most deprived areas in red

Archant

These four maps reveal stark differences in social inequality in Havering and show how the richest and poorest are sometimes living next door to each other.

Gallows Corner sits between areas of high and low deprivation Gallows Corner sits between areas of high and low deprivation

The Recorder explored the maps, created by the Department of Communities and Local Government (DCLG), to find the areas in the borough where differences in social deprivation are most marked. We found in some parts of Havering the most and least deprived are separated by a single street.

The borough-wide map is a mix of mostly yellows and oranges, showing Havering’s relative affluence compared to neighbouring boroughs such as Barking and Dagenham.

Only a tiny section is deep burgundy red, which represents neighbourhoods in the 10 per cent most deprived in England, according to the government data.

• Gallows Corner roundabout

Gallows Corner: On one side of the junction, streets in yellow are among the least deprived, while those nearby in red are in 20pc most deprived in country Gallows Corner: On one side of the junction, streets in yellow are among the least deprived, while those nearby in red are in 20pc most deprived in country

The difference in deprivation levels is starkest on either side of this major junction on Eastern Avenue.

Castellan Avenue, Pemberton Avenue, Gillian Crescent and Ferguson Avenue, in Gidea Park, are in a small cluster of streets opposite Gidea Park Sports Ground that are in the 10 or 20pc least deprived in the country.

On the other side of the intersection Neave Crescent, Launceston Close, and Faringdon Avenue, in Harold Hill, coloured dark red, are in the 20pc most deprived.

• Wentworth Way, Rainham

Wentworth Way, in Rainham, navigates through areas of high and low deprivation, shown in red and yellow Wentworth Way, in Rainham, navigates through areas of high and low deprivation, shown in red and yellow

This diverse road navigates through three different colours – yellow red and orange.

Glebe Road, one street away from Wentworth Way, is in the 30pc least deprived neighbourhoods.

But directly over the road, Stirling Close is in the 20pc most deprived on the index.

• Barnstaple Road and Montgomery Crescent

Barnstaple Road, Montgomery Crescent and surrounding streets, shown in dark burgundy red, are in the 10pc most deprived in the country Barnstaple Road, Montgomery Crescent and surrounding streets, shown in dark burgundy red, are in the 10pc most deprived in the country

A tiny cluster of four or five streets in Harold Hill are shown in dark burgundy red.

They include Barnstaple Road and Montgomery Crescent.

This is the only area of Havering in the 10pc most deprived in the country.

• St Mary’s Lane, Upminster

St Marys Lane: Most of Upminster, including this road by Cranham Golf Course, are in the 10 or 20pc least deprived in country St Marys Lane: Most of Upminster, including this road by Cranham Golf Course, are in the 10 or 20pc least deprived in country

In contrast, large swathes of Upminster, including this lane running alongside Cranham Golf Course, are in the 10pc least deprived in the England.

The government measures deprivation in all neighbourhoods in England using data about income, education, health, crime and housing, to give on overall deprivation ranking.

The DCLG has been publishing the data since the 1970s. These maps are based on data collected in 2013.

At that time Havering borough was in the 20pc least deprived areas of the country.

Explore the map, above, to see how your neighbourhood compares.

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